Tree of Forgiveness

image

This painting by Edward Burne-Jones is another wonderful example of Pre-Raphaelite art which can be seen in the Lady Lever Art Gallery in Port Sunlight, near Liverpool. The painting takes as its theme a classical myth. Phyllis fell in love with Demophoon but he went away adventuring, as Greek heroes did, for so long that she lost hope and killed herself. The gods took pity on her and turned her into an almond tree. When Demophoon eventually returned, he embraced the tree in a fit of remorse, and as the tree burst into flower, Phyllis, taking on human form again, emerged from the trunk of the tree; she forgave him and they were reunited. The intensity of the lovers’ facial expression and their gaze into each other’s eyes convey deep feelings of love and joy at their reconciliation, their physicality and the tree in full bloom give more than a hint of sexual longing and passion. I’ve seen it for myself, it is striking, beautiful and memorable, and is a fitting image for a grey back-to-work-after-holidays Monday!

26: Angel

A beautiful painting for Boxing Day. Angels are part of Christmas legend, and I love Pre-Raphaelite art, so for me, this painting combines these two thoughts perfectly. It is called ‘Angel playing a Flageolet” and was painted by Edward Burne-Jones.

image

If you happen to be in Liverpool, you can go and see this painting at Sudley House, one of the city’s many art galleries. If you love Pre-Raphaelite art, then you should visit the Lady Lever Art Gallery on the Wirral, which is full of some wonderful examples of painting of this era.

21: happy Christmas painting

An atmospheric Christmas picture today – this painting, called ‘Glade Jul’ dates from 1891 and is by the Danish painter Viggo Johansen, who was one of the Skagen Painters. I like the shadowy corners of the room and the way the candles on the tree illuminate the room and the dancers’ happy faces – the effective, beautiful juxtaposition of light and dark create a vivid impression of Christmas in the late nineteenth century.

imagePicture courtesy of Wiki Commons